AMEBOMA INTESTINAL PDF

All rights reserved. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract A year-old man presented with rectal pain and bleeding secondary to ulcerated, necrotic rectal and cecal masses that resembled colorectal carcinoma upon colonoscopy. These masses were later determined to be benign amebomas caused by invasive Entamoeba histolytica, which regressed completely with medical therapy.

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All rights reserved. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract A year-old man presented with rectal pain and bleeding secondary to ulcerated, necrotic rectal and cecal masses that resembled colorectal carcinoma upon colonoscopy.

These masses were later determined to be benign amebomas caused by invasive Entamoeba histolytica, which regressed completely with medical therapy. In Western countries, the occurrence of invasive protozoan infection with formation of amebomas is very rare and can mistakenly masquerade as a neoplasm. Not surprisingly, there have been very few cases reported of this clinical entity within the United States.

Moreover, we report a patient that had an extremely rare occurrence of two synchronous lesions, one involving the rectum and the other situated in the cecum. We review the current literature on the pathogenesis of invasive E. Infection rarely, but potentially may evolve into invasive colitis and formation of ameboma, which can closely resemble colorectal carcinoma. In general, the clinical spectrum of colorectal amebiasis ranges from asymptomatic carrier to severe fulminant necrotizing colitis with bleeding and perforation[ 1 ].

As previously reported, focal ileocolonic intussusceptions from ameboma formation serving as the lead point, although rare, can occur[ 2 ]. The experience with invasive amebiasis is largely from endemic countries.

From documentation dating back to , to date cases of invasive amebiasis have been reported in the United States, mostly comprising recent immigrants from Mexico, Central and South America, plus Asians and Pacific Islanders[ 3 ]. With increasing patterns of immigration and travel in and out of the US, continued recognition of this disease is required.

Therefore, the roles of the gastroenterologist and surgeon are to maintain a high index of clinical suspicion in patients at increased risk for this disease entity, and to distinguish this from other more common causes of gastrointestinal masses, as well as instituting appropriate therapy. In this report, diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment of this rare clinical entity from a western medical center are reviewed.

The patient described the pain as constant, without aggravating or alleviating factors. In addition, the patient complained of constipation that led to mild, crampy abdominal pain.

He denied nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or fever. The patient also denied any history of weight loss. Physical examination revealed a healthy, well-nourished man who was normothermic with normal hemodynamic parameters.

His abdominal examination was unremarkable: soft and non-tender, without any appreciable organomegaly. External anal inspection was normal. Rectal examination revealed a large, firm mass in the left lateral position, about 3 cm from the anal verge, with gross blood.

The surface of the lesion appeared necrotic and highly suggestive of carcinoma, which was the preliminary diagnosis.

CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis revealed diffuse, non-specific thickening of the rectal wall without intra-abdominal pathology. Both lesions were biopsied and were consistent with lymphocytic colitis. Serology for Entamoeba histolytica infection was also confirmed.

The rectal and cecal lesions were determined to be amebomas as a result of invasive amebiasis. The patient was given a course of oral antibiotic therapy with metronidazole for 4 wk, with complete resolution of his symptoms.

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Ameboma: A Colon Carcinoma-Like Lesion in a Colonoscopy Finding

Jugore From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Intermittent fever was also during that week. J Assoc Physicians India ; After bowel preparation, the patient complained of severe abdominal pain and developed generalized tenderness and involuntary guarding. Amoeboma of ascending colon with multiple liver abscesses. Past and personal history was not significant.

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A common symptom is colitis and a rare complication is ameboma. This complication occurs as a mass of granulation tissue and it mimic colorectal cancer. Key words Amoeba, Amoebiasis, Ameboma, Colorectal cancer Amoebiasis is a very common disease in tropical countries and represents the second cause of death from parasitic disease in the world [1] but in Western Europe and in United States is very uncommon [2]. We describe a case of intestinal amoebiasis in a young Italian man.

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