DESCUBRASE COMO LIDER PDF

Imagine that! A million dollars a year because he was able to handle people! One day at noontime, Schwab was walking through one of his steel mills when he came across a group of men smoking directly under a sign that said No Smoking. Do you suppose that Charles Schwab pointed at Chapter 1: Finding the Leader in You Charles Schwab was paid a salary of a million dollars a year in the steel business, and he told me that he was paid this huge salary largely because of his ability to handle people.

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Imagine that! A million dollars a year because he was able to handle people! One day at noontime, Schwab was walking through one of his steel mills when he came across a group of men smoking directly under a sign that said No Smoking.

Do you suppose that Charles Schwab pointed at Chapter 1: Finding the Leader in You Charles Schwab was paid a salary of a million dollars a year in the steel business, and he told me that he was paid this huge salary largely because of his ability to handle people. Schwab chatted with the men in a friendly way and never said a word about the fact that they were smoking under a No Smoking sign. He had been such a good sport with them that they in turn wanted to be good sports with him. The first step toward success is identifying your own leadership strengths.

An old friend came to Roosevelt one day in distress. His young son had left home and gone to live with his aunt. The boy was wild. He was this and he was that. And the father claimed that no one could get along with him. Roosevelt said, "Nonsense. You are more to him than all the rest of the world. The father exploded just the way the boy described.

Now you go and get acquainted with him. Meet him halfway. Communication is built on trusting relationships. Chapter 3: Motivating People Even as a boy Andrew Carnegie discovered the astonishing importance that people place on their names. When he was ten years old, he had a father rabbit and a mother rabbit. He awoke one morning to discover that he had a whole nest full of little rabbits and nothing to feed them.

What do you suppose he did? Well, he had a brilliant idea. He told half a dozen boys in the neighborhood that if they would go out every day and pull enough dandelions and grass and clover to feed the rabbits, he would name the rabbits in their honor.

The plan worked like magic, and here is the point of the story. Andrew Carnegie never forgot that incident. And years later, he made millions of dollars by using the same technique in business. He wanted to sell steel rails to the Pennsylvania Railroad. Edgar Thomson was president of the railroad then. So Andrew Carnegie, remembering the lesson he had learned from his rabbits, built a huge steel mill in Pittsburg and called it the J.

Edgar Thomson Steel works. Now let me ask you a question. When the Pennsylvania Railroad needed steel rails after that, where do you suppose J. Edgar Thomson bought them? Teamwork is the key here, not heirarchy. Always acknowledge their importance and show them respect. Everyone responds to expectations. Motivation can never be forced. People have to want to do a good job. Why not study the technique of the greatest winner of friends the world has ever known?

Who is he? You may meet him tomorrow coming down the street. When you get within ten feet of him, he will begin to wag his tail. If you stop and pat him, he will almost jump out of his skin to show you how much he likes you.

And you know that behind this show of affection on his part, there are no ulterior motives. A hen has to lay eggs. A cow has to give milk, and a canary has to sing. But a dog makes his living by giving out nothing but love. You can make more friends in two months by becoming genuinely interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get others interested in you.

Yet I know and you know people who blunder through life trying to badger other people into becoming interested in them. People are not interested in you. They are not interested in me. They are interested in themselves - morning, noon, and after dinner. I bet I got three hundred replies. I wish to apply for the position you offer. I am twenty-six years old, etc She talked about what I wanted. Her letter read like this: "Dear Sir: You will probably get two or three hundred letters in reply to your ad.

You are a busy man. I have fifteen years experience The moment I got that letter, I felt like dancing on the table. I immediately picked up the phone and told her to come over, but I was too late.

Some other employer had grabbed her. A woman like that has the business world at her feet. Chapter 6: Listening to Learn I met a distinguished botanist at a dinner party given by a New York book publisher. I had never talked with a botanist before, and I found him fascinating. I literally sat on the edge of my chair and listened while he spoke of exotic plants and experiments in developing new forms of plant life and indoor gardens.

I had a small indoor garden of my own, and he was good enough to tell me how to solve some of my problems. As I said, we were at a dinner party. There must have been a dozen other guests. But I violated all the canons of courtesy, ignored everyone else and talked for hours to the botanist. Midnight came. I said good night to everyone and departed. The botanist then turned to our host and paid me several flattering compliments.

I was most stimulating, he said. I was this, and I was that. And he ended by saying I was a most interesting conversationalist. An interesting conversationalist? I had said hardly anything at all. But I had done this: I had listened intently. I had listened because I was genuinely interested. And he felt it. Naturally, that pleased him. That kind of listening is one of the highest compliments we can pay anyone.

And so I had him thinking of me as a good conversationalist when in reality I had been merely a good listener and had encouraged him to talk.

Nobody is more persuasive than a good listener. Chapter 7: Teaming up for Tomorrow Adolph Seltz of Philadelphia, a salesman in an automobile showroom and a student in one of my courses, suddenly found himself confronted with the necessity of injecting enthusiasm into a discouraged and disorganized group of automobile salespeople.

Calling a sales meeting, he urged his people to tell him exactly what they expected of him. As they talked, he wrote their ideas on the blackboard. Now I want you to tell me what I have a right to expect from you.

Team work. Eight hours a day of enthusiastic work. Seltz reported to me that the increase in sales was phenominal. Consulting them about their wishes and desires was just the shot in the arm they needed. Chapter 8: Respecting the Dignity of Others The Chrysler organization built a special car for Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who could not use a standard car because his legs were paralyzed. Chamberlain and a mechanic delivered it to the White House. I have in front of me a letter from Mr.

Chamberlain relating his experiences. When I called at the White House," Mr.

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DESCUBRASE COMO LIDER PDF

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