HANDHELD XRF FOR ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY PDF

Shugar and Jennifer L. Mass Studies in Archaeological Sciences 3. Leuven University Press, Leuven ISBN cloth. Richards This much-needed volume is a testament to the increasing popularity of handheld or portable X-ray fluorescence analysis PXRF in art history and archaeology.

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About the author Applications, possibilities, and limitations of handheld XRF in art conservation and archaeology. Over the last decade the technique of X-ray fluorescence has evolved, from dependence on laboratory-based standalone units to field use of portable and lightweight handheld devices.

These portable instruments have given researchers in art conservation and archaeology the opportunity to study a broad range of materials with greater accessibility and flexibility than ever before. In addition, the low relative cost of handheld XRF has led many museums, academic institutions, and cultural centres to invest in the devices for routine materials analysis purposes. Although these instruments often greatly simplify data collection, proper selection of analysis conditions and interpretation of the data still require an understanding of the principles of x-ray spectroscopy.

This volume focuses specifically on the applications, possibilities, and limitations of handheld XRF in art conservation and archaeology.

The papers deal with experimental methodologies, protocols, and possibilities of handheld XRF analysis in dealing with the complexity of materials encountered in this research.

Contributors: J. Barrett University of Iowa , A. Brill Corning Museum of Glass , F. Casadio Art Institute of Chicago , M. Donais Saint Anselm College , D. Furgeson University of Missouri , D. George Saint Anselm College , B. Kaiser Bruker Elemental , A. Kaplan Getty Conservation Institute , J.

Lang, University of Iowa , J. Mass Winterthur Museum , C. Matsen Winterthur Museum , C. Patterson Getty Conservation Institute , R. Shannon Bruker-Elemental , A. Shugar Buffalo State College , J. Sirois Canadian Conservation Institute , D. Smith National Gallery of Art , D. Stulik Getty Conservation Institute , K. Trentelman Getty Conservation Institute , N. Turner Getty Conservation Institute , F. Voorhies University of California , J.

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Handheld XRF for Art and Archaeology

About the author Applications, possibilities, and limitations of handheld XRF in art conservation and archaeology. Over the last decade the technique of X-ray fluorescence has evolved, from dependence on laboratory-based standalone units to field use of portable and lightweight handheld devices. These portable instruments have given researchers in art conservation and archaeology the opportunity to study a broad range of materials with greater accessibility and flexibility than ever before. In addition, the low relative cost of handheld XRF has led many museums, academic institutions, and cultural centres to invest in the devices for routine materials analysis purposes. Although these instruments often greatly simplify data collection, proper selection of analysis conditions and interpretation of the data still require an understanding of the principles of x-ray spectroscopy. This volume focuses specifically on the applications, possibilities, and limitations of handheld XRF in art conservation and archaeology.

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Handheld XRF for art and archaeology

Buy This Book in Print summary Over the last decade the technique of X-ray fluorescence has evolved, from dependence on laboratory-based standalone units to field use of portable and lightweight handheld devices. These portable instruments have given researchers in art conservation and archaeology the opportunity to study a broad range of materials with greater accessibility and flexibility than ever before. In addition, the low relative cost of handheld XRF has led many museums, academic institutions, and cultural centres to invest in the devices for routine materials analysis purposes. Although these instruments often greatly simplify data collection, proper selection of analysis conditions and interpretation of the data still require an understanding of the principles of x-ray spectroscopy. This volume focuses specifically on the applications, possibilities, and limitations of handheld XRF in art conservation and archaeology. The papers deal with experimental methodologies, protocols, and possibilities of handheld XRF analysis in dealing with the complexity of materials encountered in this research. Table of Contents.

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