LEXICON JAMMAN MANUAL PDF

Learn how and when to remove this template message The JamMan is an audio looping device manufactured by Lexicon in the mids. The idea for the JamMan began with modifications Gary Hall had devised for the Lexicon PCM that allowed him to play into a long, looping delay whose clock could be synchronized to an external source. Hall, who worked for Lexicon in two different periods, was the primary architect of the PCM41 and PCM42, as well as the non-reverberation effects that first appeared in the X and became better known in the PCM Bob Sellon extended the concept considerably, starting with elaborate PCM42 modifications and eventually working with several others at Lexicon to arrive at the JamMan.

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It was well demonstrated at the music fairs, but apparently did not reach Lexicons sales limits and was soon discontinued. These days a JamMan can be picked up cheaply on ebay. Originally it came with 8s of memory, but expanable to a usable 32s with additional chips. The loop is mono, but usefully the dry signal is stereo. If you change mode you lose your looped audio. A tap time delay with a feedback control. Frustratingly the bypass function mutes both input and output.

A loop sampler. Tap a switch to begin record, and again to end record and commence play. After that you can select one of 3 functions: Overdub; Replace; Mute. Replace needs a press to start it, and another to end.

Mute simply mutes the loop audio as if it were running in the background. Only way to stop the loop is delete it.

Only one loop can play at once, and loop time is fixed with the first loop. Record a sample. Each time you press it starts play from the beginning, goes on to the end and stops. You can Reverse the sample, but results of reversing during playback are disappointing.

Hence the popular practise of running backwards and forwards over the same bit of loop is not supported. Midi Functions. All the switches not the knobs are accessible from Midi, however the response time is too slow for rhythmic accuracy not the case with the regular footswitch.

Would be an excellent addition if not for the latency. Fade In Loop Mode. A substitute for feedback control while in loop mode. Causes clicks at the loop boundary. You can go into fade while overdubbing to simulate a delay, but clicks are worse.

Midi Sync Out. Midi Sync In. Will hard sync to incoming midi clock, although not without clicks at loop boundary worse if overdubbing.

However, apart from the fact that the supplied footswitch can be a bit flakey it does manage the basic functions very solidly. Software upgrades are available, see below, but these either add very little, or are essentially unfinished and not claimed to be reliable.

Overall the low price and good sound quality make the JamMan worth considering as a basic looper. A replacement chip which adds a few welcome features.

Not known if issues of audio clicks and midi latency are solved. Looper Pro ia very advanced software upgrade that Bob created independent of Lexicon. Not known if any issues with original software are solved. Web site is unfinished after many years and hard to navigate. Not for the faint hearted, but could be worth checking out. Jump to the related area of the forum.

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LEXICON JAMMAN MANUAL PDF

Page 1 User Guide Lexicon Inc. Fax All Rights Reserved. Printed in the U. Lexicon Part You now possess a unique new are designed to free you from programming.

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Lexicon JamMan

Nibei An early live looping tool introduced in Mon, 25 Nov Anton Chovit: The newly recorded layered stuff will be at whatever volume the Jamman was set up for initially. So the music required marbles and water? This may seem like an unmanigable system, but it is really easy to control. I really feel like these are the early days for a great new instrument, and we are the ones defining a vocabulary for the future. I have had a lot of fun with this approach, especially when there is no-one around to jam with.

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